News Releases

Seafood Harvesters of America: Letter to Secretary Ryan Zinke

July 3, 2017 - Published in News Releases

June 20, 2017

The Honorable Ryan Zinke
Secretary, U.S. Department of Interior Monument Review MS-1530
1849 C Street NW
Washington D.C. 20240

Secretary Zinke,

On behalf of the Seafood Harvesters of America, we welcome your leadership of the Department of Interior and look forward to working with you to ensure our nation has a sustainable, stable and safe supply of seafood. As you review the establishment and management of marine monuments under the Antiquities Act, we encourage you to designate fishery management decisions within the marine monuments to the Regional Fishery Management Councils (Councils).

The United States has one of the most successful fishery management systems in the world with almost 500 federally managed stocks producing almost 10 billion pounds of seafood valued at over $5 billion annually. Through the accountability standards and conservation mandates in the Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), our fisheries have improved dramatically as the commercial fishing industry has become more responsible, transparent and efficient. The federal ecosystem-based management regime ensures conservation and optimal sustainable utilization of resources through a proven robust public, science-based process. This is in stark contrast to the monument designation process that threatens local economies by unnecessarily taking fishermen off the water across vast stretches of traditional fishing grounds and concentrating fishing effort into less productive areas.

The MSA allows for identification of Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) and regulatory mechanisms for preventing fishing in areas designated as critical. We believe the transparent MSA management process, which incorporates the best science available and engages all stakeholders is a far better mechanism than the Antiquities Act to identify and protect vital habitat.

We greatly appreciate the opportunity to work with you on these and other matters affecting the commercial fishing industry, which provides essential economic benefits for coastal communities and nutritious seafood for Americans across the nation.

Sincerely,

Chris Brown, President

Kevin Wheeler, Executive Director

SEAFOOD HARVESTERS OF AMERICA: LETTER TO SECRETARY WILBUR ROSS

June 19, 2017 - Published in News Releases

June 16, 2017

The Honorable Wilbur Ross
Secretary,
United States Department of Commerce
1401 Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20230

The Seafood Harvesters of America are deeply concerned about the temporary rule issued by the Department of Commerce to re-open and significantly extend the private angling component for red snapper in the exclusive economic zone of the Gulf of Mexico. We would greatly appreciate the opportunity to discuss with you how this rule could impact the health of the stock, the commercial fishing industry and the seafood supply chain.

We believe the rule clearly violates the Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), sets a dangerous precedent in undermining regional fisheries management and will result in overfishing a valuable species that we have fought hard to recover. Accountability is the driving force for sustainable fishery management and consequently, the commercial sector has consistently adhered to its quotas and allocations. The MSA requires that any overages in fishing be paid-back in the following year to maintain the integrity of the rebuilding schedule. However, the action taken by the Department of Commerce does the opposite by rewarding the recreational sector for overfishing its quota last year.

The rule acknowledges that “red snapper is overfished,” “the amount of red snapper that can be caught by private anglers is near an all-time high,” and “this approach may delay the ultimate rebuilding of the stock by as many as 6 years.” It justifies overfishing citing that “recreational fishing generates economic activity as consumers spend their income on various goods and services needed for recreational fishing.” The economic benefits of recreational catch are dwarfed by those of the commercial sector and seafood supply chain that support the jobs, tax revenue and economic benefits of businesses that catch, process, transport, market, prepare, serve and sell red snapper across the nation. Therefore, we would like to know if the Commerce Department considered the economic loss that the assumed overfishing would have on the seafood industry, including the charter boat and commercial sectors, before promulgating this rule.

The red snapper fishery has been a success story with the biomass of the species having more than doubled over the past decade. Consequently, allocations and landings for all sectors have also more than doubled during this time. Because recreational fishermen have garnered greater access to catch red snapper in state waters, access to federal waters has declined, but overall access and landings have continued to grow substantially. Therefore, it is a false narrative to declare that the shortened federal season is creating significant economic hardship when it is the direct result of the extended state seasons, which have been a boon to local economies that support a growing recreational fishery.

The Seafood Harvesters of America support the concept of a unified state-federal season, and believe that it should require regional management and prevent overfishing. We would like to meet with you as soon as possible to find an equitable solution that improves access to red snapper, protects the local economies that support all fishing sectors, and continues to rebuild this valuable fishery to the benefit of all Americans.

Thank you for your consideration of our concerns.

Kevin Wheeler, Executive Director

Testimony of Chris Brown to House Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice and Science

May 30, 2017 - Published in News Releases

Testimony of ChrIs Brown
President, Seafood Harvesters of America
House Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice and Science
April 28, 2017

On behalf of the Seafood Harvesters of America, I respectfully request funding for the following lines in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Marine Fisheries Service’s (NMFS) FY2018 appropriations account.

• $180,000,000 – Fisheries Data, Collection, Surveys and Assessments
• $ 50,000,000 – Observers and Training
• $125,000,000 – Fisheries Management Programs and Services
• $ 35,000,000 – Regional Councils and Fisheries Commissions
• $ 75,000,000 – Enforcement

The Harvesters represent over 3,900 small businesses, nineteen thousand jobs, almost $500 million in income and $1.25 billion in economic output. Our members are privileged to go to sea every day from the Gulf of Alaska, to the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf of Maine bringing to market healthy, domestic, sustainable seafood.

As a lifelong commercial fisherman, I can attest that after years of hard work and sacrifice, once depleted fish populations are on the rebound and landings and revenue are up where we’ve made the difficult short-term sacrifices to ensure long-term profitability. We achieved this progress by working with NMFS to design and implement rules governing our fisheries regionally, based on a shared commitment to long-term sustainability. Through the accountability standards and conservation mandates in the Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), our fisheries have improved dramatically as the commercial fishing industry has become more responsible, transparent and efficient. Where implemented, catch shares programs have ended the race to fish and enabled more flexible harvesting, allowing for more complete yields of target species, reducing bycatch and discards and avoiding catch of prohibited species.

Resulting from our joint commitment and the prioritization of funding that this committee has supported over the years, America has some of the best managed fisheries in the world. While far from perfect, this model has proven to be a wise investment for the American taxpayer. The return on investment for these funds is overwhelming as NMFS estimates that rebuilding all U.S. fish populations to healthy levels would deliver taxpayers an additional $31 billion in annual sales and support 500,000 new American jobs.

Despite successes in many fisheries, scientific and management uncertainty elsewhere has impeded sustainable harvesting practices and led to unwarranted conflict. Consequently, the Seafood Harvesters of America, support increased funding for NMFS’ programs that are vital to our ability to monitor, forecast and thus responsibly manage our fisheries.

I encourage the committee to provide additional funds to support NOAA’s ability to fight the illegal importation and poaching of seafood as well as efforts to support seafood traceability. Our hard-working harvesters demand nothing more and deserve nothing less than a level playing field in a global marketplace where far too many fish are caught and sold illegally.

The influx of invasive species, warming waters, altered currents and acidification are impacting the habitat, migration patterns and health of the fisheries that we strive to bring to market each day. I’ve fished in the same waters off of Point Judith Rhode Island for over 40 years and I’m catching species that I have never seen in Narraganset Bay. This tells me that we need better and timelier data so that we can responsibly adjust to the changes that Mother Nature is throwing our way.

We are at a turning point in the history of our nation’s fisheries, and I foresee tremendous growth with appropriate investments. However, I fear that budget cuts could lead to less information, less certainty and thus lower quotas to fish; which will devastate fishing communities along all our coasts.

We need more, not fewer, surveys of our fisheries, so we can have accurate stock assessments – the lifeblood of sustainable fisheries. We need cooperative research so that we can utilize the on-the-water experience and expertise of fishermen to better understand and predict how our fisheries are responding to climate change. And finally, we need to modernize the data systems so that we can take advantage of real-time information to avoid overfishing stocks in decline or under fishing stocks that are rebuilding.

Fishermen in both the commercial and recreational sectors have long offered to provide the data we collect while fishing. And while efforts have been taken to incorporate our contributions, too often the government is unable to use data from fishermen because its’ existing systems are not equipped to handle the additional input. Consequently, I greatly appreciate the committees continued support for incorporating agency-independent data into stock assessments.

Investments in technology could help lighten the heavy burden of the cost of human observers who are often required to measure catch, a job that could be accomplished in many instances by cameras and other technology. Personally, I have installed a camera system on my boat that increases the value of data coming out of the fishery by recording the catch when I haul back the nets. I hope the committee will continue to support innovations and implementation of electronic monitoring and reporting technologies that I have found can provide invaluable fisheries knowledge and data.

Our harvesters work in some of the most harsh and dangerous environments and leave the dock each day not knowing for sure if they will return to their loved ones. Consequently, safety is of utmost importance for our industry. However, our fishing fleet is aging and thus less safe than ideal. We desperately require access to finances to construct safer vessels and therefore, encourage recapitalization opportunities through NOAA’s Fishing Finance Program.

I greatly appreciate your consideration of the Harvester’s appropriations requests. I believe these investments will produce valuable returns for our domestic industries that harvest, process, market, deliver, prepare and serve seafood to Americans across the nation. Accountability is critical for success and as fishermen we will continue to champion transparency so that we can to make wild-caught fish a viable, enduring, dependable source of food.

Christopher Brown
President, Seafood Harvesters of America

Letter to House of Representatives on Huffman Amendment to H.R. 953

May 24, 2017 - Published in News Releases

The United States House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20515

May 23, 2017
Dear Representative:

On behalf of thousands of tribal, commercial, and recreational fishermen who depend on healthy fisheries for their subsistence, traditional cultural practices, businesses, and recreational enjoyment, we write to urge you to vote YES on the Huffman amendment to H.R. 953. The amendment would ensure that existing Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) permitting requirements for point source polluters remain in place when science clearly indicates they are needed to protect fisheries.

Under §402 of the FWPCA, the Administrator of the EPA may issue permits for point source discharges of approved pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides into navigable waters, which are also inhabited by many important and valuable fish species that are worth billions of dollars to fishermen and anglers each year. H.R. 953 would eliminate the EPA’s permitting authority for approved pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides discharged into navigable waters. Many of these chemicals, despite their approval for agricultural use, are known to be seriously harmful to iconic fish species including salmon and trout, jeopardizing their survival and posing a risk to the food supply.

Congressman Huffman’s amendment to H.R. 953 would simply leave EPA permitting requirements in place for the dumping of pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides into our streams and rivers when they are known to pose a significant risk to fisheries. We ask that you support this amendment in order to keep America’s fisheries and strong fishing traditions alive, safe, and prosperous. If you have any questions, please call Noah Oppenheim, Executive Director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations, at (415) 561-5080.

Sincerely,

Noah Oppenheim
Executive Director
Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations

Leaf Hillman
Director, Department of Natural Resources Karuk Tribe
Karuk Tribe

Caleen Sisk
Chief
Winnemem Wintu Tribe

Robert Vandermark
Executive Director
Marine Fish Conservation Network

Kevin Wheeler
Executive Director
Seafood Harvesters of America

Roger Thomas
President
Golden Gate Salmon Association

Bob Rees
Executive Director
Association of Northwest Steelheaders

Linda Behnken
Executive Director
Alaska Longline Fishermen’s Association

Grant Putnam
President
Northwest Guides and Anglers Association

Benjamin Bulis
President
American Fly Fishing Trade Association

Lyf Gildersleeve
Owner
Flying Fish Company

Kevin Scribner
Chief Executive
Officer Forever Wild Seafood

Cynthia Sarthou
Executive Director
Gulf Restoration Network

Seafood Harvesters of America Oppose Pebble Mine Development

May 16, 2017 - Published in News Releases

The Seafood Harvesters of America are profoundly troubled by the reported settlement between EPA and Northern Dynasty Minerals that clears the way for the Canadian mining company to pursue the development of the proposed Pebble Mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska.

The Bristol Bay watershed in southwestern Alaska supports a $1.5 billion annual sustainable and renewable salmon fishery.  Consequently, the Seafood Harvesters believe that the existing 14,000 American jobs generated by Bristol Bay’s ecological resources should trump the short-term interests of a foreign mining company.

As commercial fishermen, we frequently work closely and productively with other industries in the marine environment. We have often found opportunities to coexist, while effectively conserving ocean resources for future generations.   However, developing a mine at the headwaters of the world’s most productive salmon fishery is not one of those places.

There is too much at risk should even a small fraction of a potential 10 billion tons of mining waste makes its way into the Alaskan ecosystem. A 2014 federal scientific study found that in the course of normal, safe operations, the Pebble Mine would destroy, block or otherwise alter up to 94 miles of salmon streams. A significant human or engineering failure would likely result in a decades-length catastrophic loss of salmon and degraded habitat for the other 29 fish species in the region.

As fishermen, we have a great respect for both the power of the ocean and the fragility of fish species. We strive to preserve and protect the ocean environment, while harvesting marine resources sustainably. We embrace accountability and transparency to ensure that we do no harm to the ocean upon which we rely, so that we can have productive fisheries for generations to come. We encourage the Trump Administration to stand beside the hard working fishermen and women who oppose the Pebble Mine to ensure that we can continue to bring to market healthy, domestic and delicious seafood.

 

Kevin Wheeler
Executive Director

Seafood Harvesters of America Voice Concern Over Modern Fish Act

April 7, 2017 - Published in News Releases

Washington, D.C. – April 6, 2017 – Today, the commercial fishing community expressed the following concerns to the introduction of a bill that exempts saltwater recreational fishing from sustainable management efforts.

Introduced by Congressmen Garret Graves (R-La.), Gene Green (D-Texas), Daniel Webster (R-Fla.) and Rob Wittman (R-Va.), the “Modernizing Recreational Fisheries Management Act of 2017” (Modern Fish Act) would hamstring federal regional fishery councils’ ability to manage the fishery sector and most species, while also limiting the ability to innovate new solutions to overfishing.

“We support the bill sponsors’ effort to obtain additional, more accurate and real-time data on our fisheries and in particular, the recreational sector, which will help better manage our fisheries. However, this bill would fundamentally exempt the recreational fishing community from adhering to the basic conservation standards that have been central to the rebuilding of many of our fish stocks. Waiting for fisheries to be overfished before we act led to stock collapses in the past and created economic hardship for the entire fishing industry. We can’t afford to take that route again. Doing so would devastate not only the fisheries themselves, but would have enormous economic impact on the commercial sectors that harvest, process, market, and sell seafood across the nation. While not engaged in the drafting of this legislation, we look forward to working with Congress, NOAA and the fishing community to ensure that we have accountability in both the commercial and recreational sectors so that our fisheries can be a renewable resource for the enjoyment of all Americans,” said Seafood Harvesters of America Executive Director, Kevin Wheeler.

The Harvesters is a broad-based association that represents the following commercial fishing organizations coast-to-coast.

Alaska Bering Sea Crabbers
Alaska Whitefish Trawlers Association
Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen’s Alliance
Cordova District Fishermen United
Fishing Vessel Owners’ Association
Fort Bragg Groundfish Association
Georges Bank Cod Fixed Gear Sector, Inc.
Gulf Fishermen’s Association
Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Shareholder’s Alliance
Massachusetts Lobstermen’s Association
Midwater Trawlers Cooperative
New Hampshire Groundfish Sectors
North Pacific Fisheries Association (NPFA)
Purse Seine Vessel Owners Association (PSVOA)
Rhode Island Commercial Fishermen’s Association
South Atlantic Fishermen’s Association
United Catcher Boats

Seafood Harvesters of America: Letter to Secretary Wilbur Ross

April 6, 2017 - Published in News Releases

March 31, 2017

The Honorable Wilbur Ross
Secretary U.S. Department of Commerce
1401 Constitution Ave NW
Washington, DC 20230

Secretary Ross,

On behalf of the Seafood Harvesters of America, we welcome your leadership of the Commerce Department and look forward to working with you to ensure our nation has a sustainable, stable and safe supply of seafood.

The United States has one of the most successful fishery management systems in the world with almost 500 federally managed stocks producing almost 10 billion pounds of seafood valued at over $5 billion annually. Our members are privileged to go to sea every day from coast to coast to bring to market healthy, domestic, sustainable seafood. We honor, depend upon and live with accountability in our fisheries and transparency in the regulatory process.

Through the accountability standards and conservation mandates in the Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), our fisheries have improved dramatically as the commercial fishing industry has become more responsible, transparent and efficient. Where implemented, catch share programs have ended the race to fish and enabled more flexible harvesting. This allows for more complete yields of target species, which reduces bycatch and discards, avoiding catch of prohibited species.   It is within these sustainably managed fisheries that we encourage the Administration to focus its regulatory reform efforts to acknowledge, reward and incentivize success through market-based solutions. This can facilitate the innovation of new fishing gear to further reduce habitat damage and bycatch.

Despite successes in many fisheries, scientific and management uncertainty elsewhere has impeded sustainable harvesting practices and led to unwarranted conflict. You recently testified that one of your top three challenges was “integrating technology into the Department to improve efficiency as well as the timeliness, depth and breadth of data…” We believe that the modernization and streamlining of fishery information systems is critical to provide more timely science for better management decisions. Unfortunately, existing systems are built using technology and practices that are outdated, slow, incomplete, expensive and often inaccurate. Relying on pen and paper to track billions of fish is obviously antiquated and results in management uncertainty and economic inefficiencies. We look forward to working with you to innovate and implement electronic monitoring and electronic reporting of real-time catch data for both the commercial and recreational sectors.

Because we depend upon access to the sea for our livelihoods, decisions to reduce quotas or restrict fishing are always contentious. However, we willfully engage in the MSA process and abide by the decisions made through the regional councils, which have effectively prevented overfishing, rebuilt dozens of fish stocks and provided greater regulatory and economic certainty for our industry. MSA allows for identification of Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) and regulatory mechanisms for preventing fishing in areas designated as essential. We prefer utilizing the MSA management regime that incorporates the best science available, engages all stakeholders and is transparent. Consequently, we encourage the Administration to revisit the national monument designation process that unnecessarily takes fishermen off the water across vast stretches of traditional fishing grounds, threatening local economies, increasing our seafood deficit, and ignoring the federal fishery management process.

Our harvesters work in some of the most harsh and dangerous environments and leave the dock each day not knowing for sure if they will return to their loved ones. Consequently, safety is of the utmost importance for our industry and we greatly appreciate the support of the Coast Guard in protecting our men and women through reasonable safety standards. However, our fishing fleet is aging and thus less safe than ideal. We desperately require access to finances to recapitalize our fishing fleet and encourage you to facilitate recapitalization through NOAA’s Fishing Finance Program or other mechanisms as the Administration invests in the nation’s infrastructure.

With regards to trade policy, we ask that you help level the playing field for American harvesters. Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing is a multi-billion dollar scourge on our industry; to the extent that one in every five fish sold is caught illegally. This problem is geographically dispersed from foreign poachers in the Gulf of Mexico to illegal Russian crabs entering our marketplace from the Bering Sea. We ask you to champion fair trade standards and implement policies such as NOAA’s seafood traceability rule to ensure that we can compete fairly in the global marketplace.

Finally, we need to ensure that at-sea fish surveys, fishery stock assessments, and cooperative research continue to be a priority throughout the budget process. This is the fundamental basis for which our fisheries are managed and require consistent, sustainable funding to ensure that we are harvesting robustly and sustainably. The return on investment for these funds is overwhelming as the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) estimates that rebuilding all U.S. fish populations to healthy levels would deliver taxpayers an additional $31 billion in annual sales and support 500,000 new American jobs.

We greatly appreciate the opportunity to work with you on these and other matters affecting the commercial fishing industry, which provides essential economic benefits for coastal communities and nutritious seafood for Americans across the nation.

Sincerely,

Chris Brown, President

Kevin Wheeler, Executive Director

Marine Monuments Letter to Representative Rob Bishop

March 22, 2017 - Published in News Releases

March 13, 2017

The Honorable Rob Bishop
Chairman
House Committee on Natural Resources
1324 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Chairman Bishop:

On behalf of the Seafood Harvesters of America, I want to express our appreciation for your leadership in examining the creation and management of marine monuments and sanctuaries. The extensive use of the Antiquities Act has unnecessarily impacted the commercial fishing industry, which has otherwise willingly adopted responsible approaches to prevent overfishing.

The Harvesters represent over 3,900 small businesses, 19,000 jobs, almost $500 million in income and $1.25 billion in economic output. Our members are privileged to go to sea every day from the Gulf of Alaska, to the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf of Maine bringing to market healthy, domestic, sustainable seafood. We honor, depend upon and live with accountability in our fisheries and transparency in the regulatory process. Through the Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), our fisheries have improved dramatically as the commercial fishing industry has become more responsible, accountable, and efficient.

The MSA allows for identification of Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) and regulatory mechanisms for preventing fishing in areas designated as essential. This process had been completed through the New England Fishery Management Council, which would have designated extensive areas for EFH protection along the Atlantic Seaboard, from the Carolinas to the Canadian border. This collaborative decade-long process that incorporated the best science available, stakeholder engagement and featured transparency was overridden by the establishment of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument. With the stroke of a pen, President Obama unnecessarily took fishermen off the water across vast stretches of traditional fishing grounds, threatening local economies, increasing our seafood deficit, and ignoring the federal fishery management process.

While management decisions to reduce quotas or restrict fishing are always contentious, we willfully engage in the process and abide by the decisions made through the regional council process as it has worked to prevent overfishing, rebuilt dozens of fish stocks and provided greater regulatory and economic certainty for our industry. Consequently, we believe that fishery decisions should continue to be managed through the MSA-established processes and not be subject to restrictions through the monument designation process.

We look forward to working with you to ensure that we have a sustainable, renewable and a stable seafood supply that is managed with regulatory certainty and not subject to politically driven executive action.

Sincerely,

Chris Brown, President

Kevin Wheeler, Executive Director

Kevin Wheeler Joins Seafood Harvesters

December 11, 2016 - Published in News Releases

NEWS RELEASE

MEDIA CONTACT: Scott Coughlin, (206) 228-4141, scott@seafoodharvesters.org

Kevin Wheeler Joins Seafood Harvesters

New executive director brings extensive oceans and public affairs expertise to leading commercial fishing group

(WASHINGTON – December 12, 2016) The Seafood Harvesters of America announced today that they have hired Kevin Wheeler, of Arlington, VA, as their executive director.

Kevin comes to the Seafood Harvesters after serving ten years as Vice President and Director of Public Affairs at the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, where he was responsible for developing, advocating for and implementing ocean research priorities on behalf of more than 100 of the nation’s leading ocean research and educational institutions. In that role he served as primary liaison between the ocean science community and Congress, the executive branch, federal agencies and non-governmental organizations. He and his staff also led advocacy coalitions in support of budgets for federal agencies including NSF, NOAA and DOD.

Formerly, Kevin was the Director of Federal Relations for Brown University; worked on the Science Committee for the U.S. House of Representatives; served as the Special Assistant to the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; and also worked on Capitol Hill as Press Secretary and Legislative Assistant to former Congressman Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY).

“Our organization is at an exciting growth stage and we really wanted to get this hire right,” said Seafood Harvesters’ President Christopher Brown. “Kevin is extremely well prepared to take our members to a new level of engagement and influence at the federal level. His management experience, his Capitol Hill committee and staff work, and his years at Ocean Leadership are great preparation, and we could not be happier about welcoming him on board.”

“I am truly honored to have been chosen to lead and provide a unified voice for the Seafood Harvesters at this most critical time, given the political transition occurring in Washington coupled with a rapidly changing ocean environment,” said Wheeler. “Together we will champion accountability, responsibility and innovation throughout our industry to ensure that future generations will have healthy, robust and sustainable fisheries to harvest.”

Kevin holds advanced degrees in Environmental Management and Public Administration from Duke and Binghamton Universities respectively. Kevin and his wife Marina reside in Arlington Virginia where they are raising their children Nikolai and Ekaterina.

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The Seafood Harvesters of America represent 17 member associations and over 3,900 commercial fishing businesses operating in waters of the North Pacific, West Coast, Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic and New England regions. Please learn more at seafoodharvesters.org and connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.